Category Archives: 2 Dream Chasing

Imagineering: Essential Questions

  • In what ways do you consider yourself creative or innovative?
  • In what areas do you wish you were more creative or innovative?
  • What stimulates your imagination?
  • What are some areas within your industry or profession where innovation most needs to happen?
  • Based on recognized problems and developments you have seen in recent years, what is the likely next wave of your industry or profession? What change is currently emerging?
  • If you could change careers without losing any income, would you do it? If so, what would you do differently?

Think Ponds Make Meaning

By Deborah Vrabel

Think Ponds can be invaluable for those who want to explore career alternatives, but even those who are uninterested in making a major change can get value from exploring the enterprises and designing or participating in a project. I call these “Meaning Projects.” See what you think of these four models for creative response to different stages of life and different crossroads.

These are the themes each model will explore:

  • Finding and Holding on to What’s Precious
  • Reinventing Your Future
  • Building a Legacy
  • Feasting on Your Life

Networking for the “Others”

By Deborah Vrabel

I want to create a new kind of networking event–one designed specifically for introverts, idealists, and iconoclasts.

With the typical “networking” event, jobseekers walk around and talk to people about what they do and are interested in doing–displaying how stylish, likeable, articulate, and charismatic they can be–hoping someone will give them a lead or at least keep their card.

Think Pond networking events will be opportunities to create, ask good questions, and share ideas. Your mind, your imagination, your passion will speak for you.

Reflection on the Origin of Think Pond

By Deborah Vrabel

Pinpointing when and how the Think Pond concept originated is difficult. There was a moment when the name came to me and a conversation that inspired that moment, but Think Pond ripples across decades of language, ideas, relationship, observation, experience, and yearning.

Still I think it best to begin with Now–because Now is the epicenter of everything. Now contains the reasons anyone would care about this venture.

Today’s Think Pond links to recent conversations I’ve had with people who have gifts they are eager to share and aspirations that lie outside these things we have invented called “jobs” and “career paths.” Some of them have great jobs, good pay, and work they love and want to keep doing. But they had to shed a cherished piece of their dreams to have it. They had to re-channel much of their learning, their skill, their imagination, and their time in one direction.

I’ve talked with people who are underemployed, underutilized, or under-credentialed. Some are over 50, struggling to make sense of the technological tectonics that dwarf even the Industrial Revolution. They’re yearning to share or maybe reframe knowledge they gained over the years but they lack the platform, the tools, the apps. Others are just starting out and are facing tough choices in a tough economy. They’re finding they need to learn constantly and widely, to find a creative outlet, to think like entrepreneurs. Some of them are struggling to be great parents without compromising the work they love. Some are stalled, their unique, amazing gifts kept in check because of obstacles that could be easily removed with some mentoring, tech support, feedback, or sometimes just a bit of encouragement.

All those stories–told by people representing a range of ages, professions, education and income levels, and talents–leave me with these questions:

  • What richness, what knowledge, what solutions are we losing?
  • What if people could craft their jobs based on what they have to give and want to give the world?

Creativity Springs

By Deborah Vrabel

For awhile I thought about naming my business Creativity Springs. I imagined the different reactions of everyone I’ve encountered professionally. Some people would relate to it and automatically assume that I’m a very creative person. Others, especially those with project management responsibilities, would politely try to move the conversation onto a less metaphorical plane where the “real work” gets done. Those who haven’t seen that I can easily switch to an analytical, goal-oriented mindset when needed might be less inclined to hire me or hesitant to work with me.

But I liked the way Creativity Springs can be read as either a sentence or a proper noun for a place. I liked the image of adding some pure, cool water for my readers as they evaluate a grant proposal or a position statement I’ve written. When my work needs to be distinctive and compelling, I like the idea of this mysterious undercurrent we can all bring to light if we make a habit of looking for its shimmer and take the time to let it bubble up to the surface.

My clients don’t pay for the time I spend in Creativity Springs. To me, the opportunity to go there is its own reward and the paid work is all about making something clients can use. Still some of the projects I’ve supported through my writing have benefited greatly from my trips to Creativity Springs.

  • The creative titles or metaphors I find there have helped committees renew their focus and energy for the work during a long or contentious deliberation process.
  • The element of story I weave subtly into the work helps the intended users of a report or technical guidance document to understand more clearly or to see themselves in the implementation.
  • The words and images I find there lead to better illustrations and cover design and can reduce the costs and iterations of the design process.
  • The research or intense observation that fueled the analytical writing yields insights about how to increase visibility, broaden readership, or determine next steps.

Whatever you do in work and life, I encourage you to make a trip to Creativity Springs a part of your journey. Like Narnia, Wonderland, and other mythical places, it’s not far from you–but it will change you.