Tag Archives: vision

Weekly Reflection: A Full Notebook

On August 23, 2016, I picked up an 80-page journal and started recording ideas and taking notes for a book centered on an idea I had been playing with and talking about for quite a while. It was called the think pond.

This weekend, at a cabin by a river, I filled the last page.

Now what?

I now have 80 pages of thoughts and ideas that can be used in a book or in-depth essay. I think I have the makings of a model people can use as our world undergoes what some have said is a wave of change that is more profound than the Industrial Revolution and seems to be on the verge of breaking. Now it is time to pull it together into a work that has a distinct identity and that people can understand and use.

The two years it took to fill this notebook and write about some of the ideas have been tumultuous. I have lost my Dad and sister-in-law. My household has expanded, pushing me out of one office and then another. (I have been working at home since 1996.) In January 2017, my two little grandsons, now ages 6 and 4, came to live with us. Work in that year was mostly impossible because the promise of these two little lives was even more compelling to me. And of course, the consequences of the 2016 election invaded my thoughts, making me question much about human nature, the systems I thought I knew, and the future. Both the pressure of urgency and the inertia of despair have been present. Many times, I thought about quitting. Writing is hard. The children need so much from me. But this vision I have will not let me go.

So I am making a one-year plan for getting this project—the book and the organization needed to make it known—into a state of reality and off the ground. (Or should I say on the ground and out of the clouds?)

What is a Think Pond?

Think Ponds are fluid associations of diverse individuals who bring their imaginations, knowledge, and skill sets, along with their dreams and passion projects, into a community of their own design. Creative energies converge, expanding possibility. Obstacles are flattened as complementary skills combine and available resources broaden. Timelines contract. Promising ideas stay out of the trash. Connections proliferate.

For individuals, a Think Pond is a next generation platform for shaping and strengthening four essential lifelong enterprises: 1) Dream chasing, 2) Life-embedded learning, 3)Solution-crafting, and 4) Entrepreneurial experimentation. Making the most of these enterprises will both improve your competitive edge and increase your level of fulfillment with the work you do in the world.

For the greater good, an evolving ecosystem of Think Ponds is a wellspring of creativity and collaboration that can increase the sustainability of innovative, socially valuable programs, incubate new businesses, and activate unrealized human potential.

The Four Enterprises

Do you think of a career as a sequence of jobs with progressively higher pay and greater responsibility? What if you reimagined your career as a set of four lifelong enterprises that you continuously create and expand and refine. Merriam-Webster defines an enterprise as “a project or undertaking that is especially difficult, complicated, or risky.” In other words, I am talking about endeavors that continue whether you are employed, unemployed, or under-employed. Whatever your circumstances, you keep these four enterprises alive because they supply something you need.

I think everyone need to pursue these four lifelong enterprises, regardless of the individual’s passions, aptitudes, credentials, employment experiences, assets, and constraints:

Dream Chasing. Using your imagination fully. Paying attention to the sensory experiences, images, and cultural expressions that swirl around you and mindfully pursuing those that awaken your mind, heighten the intensity of your emotions, and enrich your soul. Exploring possibilities, envisioning your desired future, and inventing the kinds of endeavors that will both fulfill you and make a positive difference. . . .

Life-Embedded Learning. Taking advantage of the numerous learning opportunities afforded by books, media entities, technologies, community resources, and people in your sphere. Continually investigating what you know and what you think you know. Consciously developing and applying new skills, adapting existing knowledge and skills in new areas, and finding greater depth of meaning and significance in the people, environments, and experiences you encounter.

Solution Crafting.  Looking at your life from different perspectives and seeking ways to synergize your assets and talents. Bringing an artistic sensibility, design thinking, and surprise into whatever you produce. Continually generating divergent ideas about how to look at and respond to circumstances, problems, challenges, opportunities, and desires–both individually and collaboratively. . . . .

Entrepreneurial Experimentation. Thinking about and testing ways to carry your ideas and solutions forward into the marketplace for your profit, into the public sphere for the good of others and the enrichment of the culture, or just into a wider conversation for their continued development and enrichment.